Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Reviews, GIA Excellent, Broad Spectrum vs Pin-Fire type sparkle.

This Review of the Canadian Diamonds offered by Blue Nile is an extension of an article that features Blue Nile Canada as a preferred vendor of Nice Ice. The article was written to benefit residents of Canada, who might find it preferable to purchase a diamond from the Blue Nile Canada division of Blue Nile for reasons pertaining to customs and the import and export of diamonds. During the course of writing the article, I conducted a search for Blue Nile Canadian Diamonds and found fifteen diamonds produced from diamond rough that originated from Canada which I feel are exceptional, and which I thought would be of interest to a wider audience, thus I’ve chosen to review them here.

Dividing the House ~ Broad Spectrum vs Pin-Fire Sparkle:

If you’ve spent any time on this web site reading the blog posts and educational articles provided, then by now you should have converted to the House of Ideal Cut and be fully submerged in the vat of Kool Aid that I prepared for your consumption long ago… There should be no further need to convince you of the benefits of buying an ideal cut diamond as defined within the article 15 Seconds to Diamond Buying Success, within which you will find the guidelines by which you will be sure to find the diamond of your dreams.

There you will also find reference to my preference for lower girdle facet length, which is one of the primary features of an ideal cut diamond, which will have a direct impact upon the size and intensity of the sparkle, in conjunction with degree of optical precision exhibited by the diamond ~ which can only be judged by viewing the diamond through various reflector scopes, such as an ASET Scope, an Ideal Scope, and ultimately a Hearts and Arrows viewer.

Broad Spectrum Sparkle vs Pin Fire Sparkle, the effect of lower girdle facet length on diamondsThere are essentially two categories of sparkle that are common to ideal cut diamonds. “Broad Spectrum Sparkle” is sparkle that is larger in size, and which tends to be bolder, brighter, and more vivid than “Pin-Fire Sparkle” which is smaller in size, and which tends to make a diamond look a bit icier and give off a kind of crushed ice look. The easiest way to picture the difference between the two types of sparkle is to look at the size of sparkle created by facets of different shapes on a crystal chandelier fob like the one pictured to the left, which is exhibiting broad spectrum sparkle because of the larger facet size. If the same crystals featured smaller facets, it would produce sparkle that is smaller in size.

The degree of optical precision exhibited by a diamond is also a contributing factor to the size and intensity of the sparkle. The term “optical precision” refers to the consistency of facet shape, size, and alignment from the perspective of three hundred and sixty degrees, this is not something that is taken into account by gemological laboratories when assessing the overall cut grade of a diamond. Refer to this article on the Creation of Hearts and Arrows patterns in Round Brilliant Cut Diamonds for additional details.

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I make no secret of the fact that I personally prefer round brilliant ideal cut diamonds which exhibit broad spectrum sparkle, but the reality is that I have plenty of clients who seem to prefer diamonds that exhibit pin-fire type sparkle. It is truly a matter of personal preference, and possibly something that the average diamond buyer need not concern themselves with. However I like to provide my clients with as much detail as possible, in an effort to ensure that they end up buying whichever style of ideal cut diamond is most appealing to their personal sense of style and taste.

Thus I’m going to divide these fifteen Reviews of Blue Nile Canadian Diamonds into two categories, those which are likely exhibit broad spectrum sparkle, and those which are likely to exhibit pin-fire type sparkle. Note the use of the term “likely” to exhibit one type of sparkle or the other, this is because these diamonds are graded by the GIA, and the GIA rounds off the measurements stated on their diamond grading reports, and thus it can be difficult to predict the sparkle factor of GIA Excellent cut round diamonds, as opposed to the ease of which it can be done with diamonds graded by the AGS Laboratory, because there can be more than a 2% variance in the length of the lower girdle facet measurements stated on the lab report.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamonds Likely to Exhibit Broad Spectrum Sparkle…

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2127828558

Blue Nile Canadian round diamond reviews, LD02411346, GIA 2127828558This 1.06 carat, I-color, VVS-1 clarity, round Canadian diamond from Blue Nile has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent. This diamond is cut to proportions that represent the absolute center sweet spot! The 40.8 degree pavilion angle will produce a high volume of light return, while the 34.5 degree crown angle produces a virtual balance of brilliance (white sparkle) and dispersion (colored sparkle) and the 75% lower girdle facet length should produce the broad spectrum sparkle that I look for in an ideal cut diamond. The diamond grading report number is inscribed on the girdle edge of the diamond, along with the symbol of the Canadian Maple Leaf, which indicates that the diamond was produced from diamond rough that originated in Canada.

Unfortunately I was unable to obtain a clarity photograph or reflector scope images for this Canadian diamond from Blue Nile, so there is no way to judge the degree of optical precision. However it is possible that Blue Nile might be able to obtain them. Click the link to order the diamond, and then follow up with a phone call to Blue Nile. Tell them that you are “working with the affiliate site Nice Ice, and ask them to manually take over the shopping cart.”

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This is a key phrase that Blue Nile and I have created to ensure that my clients receive a higher level of customer service than they are likely to experience at the initial levels of the customer service food chain so-to-speak. Placing the diamond in your shopping carat before calling ensures that it is taken off the market electronically, to prevent it from being sold out from under you.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA #5123828560

Blue Nile Signature Canadian round diamond review, LD02411293, GCAL BN222980104This 1.12 carat, I-color, VVS-1 clarity, Signature Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent, and is accompanied by a supplementary GCAL diamond grading report. The GCAL report provides a clarity photograph of the diamond as seen from the top down crown view, and through the lower pavilion view, thus we are able to more or less judge the optical precision of the diamond, although not as well as we’d be able to with traditional reflector scope images which use colored filters to make it easier to differentiate between the different sections of the diamond. It appears to me that there is just a little bit of variation between the size and shape of the hearts, indicating that the optical precision of the diamond is better than average.

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Meaning that it is better than what the majority of ideal cut diamonds which were not specifically cut to exhibit a crisp and complete pattern of hearts and arrows tend to exhibit. The 40.8 degree pavilion angle will produce a high volume of light return, while the 34.5 degree crown angle produces a virtual balance of brilliance (white sparkle) and dispersion (colored sparkle) and the 75% lower girdle facet length should produce the broad spectrum sparkle that I look for in an ideal cut diamond.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 5121581744

Blue Nile Canadian round diamond reviews, LD01501328, GIA 5121581744-1This 1.59 carat, G-color, Internally Flawless clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent. Here again the diamond has a pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees, which is offset by a crown angle of 34.5 degrees, and features 75% lower girdle facets… You might be beginning to notice a trend in my selection process, and should know by now that this diamond is going to exhibit a high volume of light return, with a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, in the form of broad spectrum sparkle. Once again the diamond is inscribed with the Canadian Maple Leaf logo, along with the diamond grading report number to assist with identification, which is a good thing given the Internally Flawless clarity grade, because you’re not going to be able to identify the diamond by the inclusions. Because the diamond is “Internally Flawless” when viewed through 10x magnification, which is the industry standard for diamond clarity grading. The comment “minor details of polish are not shown” is an industry standard CYA statement that appears on the diamond grading reports for all diamonds graded as Internally Flawless, it’s nothing to be concerned about. Note that inclusions may be visible at higher levels of magnification, such as 40x and higher.

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Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2121903056

Blue Nile Canadian round diamond reviews, LD01906181, GIA 2121903056-1This 1.64 carat, G-color, Internally Flawless clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile, has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent. Once again the pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees is going to produce a high volume of light return, while the crown angle of 34.5 degrees produces a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 75% lower girdle facet length should produce broad spectrum sparkle which is larger in size. I was not able to obtain a clarity photograph or reflector scope images, but once again Blue Nile might be able to obtain them. Although there really isn’t much to see in an internally flawless clarity diamond. Even without the reflector scope images, I can tell you that based upon the overall cut grade of GIA Excellent and the center range ideal cut proportions, that the diamond is easily within the Top 1% of round brilliant cut diamonds produced in the average year. We just can’t judge the degree of optical precision without an ASET Scope, an Ideal Scope, and a Hearts and Arrows Scope image. But there is no doubt in my mind that the diamonds featured within this Blue Nile Canada Diamonds review are all going to be drop dead gorgeous! “By the numbers” they should all be top performing diamonds that exhibit exceptional light return and sparkle!

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Blue Nile Canadian Diamonds Likely to Exhibit Pin-fire Sparkle…

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 6147117159

Blue Nile Canada diamond reviews, LD02374304, GIA 6147117159, GCAL 250860106This 1.01 carat, H-color, VVS-1 clarity, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round diamond has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent and is accompanied by a supplemental diamond grading report issued by GCAL. The pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees is going to provide a high volume of light return, while the 34.5 degree crown angle will produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion. The 80% lower girdle facets are likely to produce pin-fire type sparkle that is slightly smaller in size than the broad spectrum sparkle exhibited by the Blue Nile Canada diamonds reviewed previously. I describe this type of light return as being kind of like the smaller sparkle that can be seen reflecting off the mirrors of a disco ball…

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Although the GCAL report provides a photograph of the hearts and arrows pattern exhibited by this GIA Excellent cut, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round cut diamond, and gives it a rating of Excellent, I have to respectfully disagree with that assessment. There is clearly a variance in the size and shape of the hearts, and the tips of five of the hearts are bending pretty significantly and the clefts of the hearts are split in a bunch of places, thus I would not consider the pattern of hearts and arrows to be excellent, but rather very good. It’s still going to be a gorgeous diamond, but it is not what I consider to be a hearts and arrows diamond, just a really nice ideal cut diamond with an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2145360829

Blue Nile Canadian diamond reviews, LD02432160, GIA 2145360829, GCAL 250860107This 1.02 carat, H-color, VVS-1 clarity, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round diamond has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent, and is accompanied by a supplementary diamond grading report issued by GCAL. Once again, while the GCAL report states that the hearts and arrows pattern of the diamond is excellent, I have to disagree and grade the pattern as very good; due to slight variations in the size and shape of the hearts, some twisting at the tips of the hearts and splitting within the clefts of the hearts. While this is largely a matter of opinion, I was taught to grade Hearts and Arrows diamonds by Brian Gavin back in 1996, and adhere to the original Japanese grading standards, whereas most of the industry just calls it H&A if any sort of pattern is apparent.

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True Hearts and Arrows cut diamonds exhibit a pattern of hearts and arrows that is more consistent as far as the size and shape of the hearts, and there should not be any significant amount of twisting visible at the tips of the hearts, and there should not be any substantial splits in the clefts of the hearts, as has been explained in this article which explains the Creation of Hearts and Arrows Patterns in Round Brilliant Cut Diamonds.

Diamonds that exhibit a crisp and complete pattern of hearts and arrows, like those featured in the Brian Gavin Signature collection are considered to be within the Top 0.001% of the annual production of round brilliant cut diamonds, whereas diamonds like this 1.02 carat, H-color, VVS-1 clarity, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round cut diamond fall into the spectrum of the Top 1% because the pattern of hearts and arrows is not extremely precise.

The question that you have to answer for yourself is whether you really need a diamond that is within the Top 0.001% of the annual production for round brilliant cut diamonds, or if something in the Top 1% is good enough. Because true hearts and arrows quality diamonds cost more than traditional ideal cut diamonds such as this one, because it takes about four times longer to polish a diamond to the higher degree of optical precision necessary to produce a crisp and complete pattern of hearts and arrows, polishing diamonds to that degree of perfection requires more expensive diamond cutting technology, and the higher degree of skill required to polish the diamonds so perfectly represents a higher cost of labor.

As with the other Blue Nile Canada ideal cut diamonds reviewed thus far, the 40.8 degree pavilion angle is going to produce a high volume of light return, while the 35.0 degree crown angle should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should result in pin-fire type sparkle that is very similar to a disco ball.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIAL 2141315883

Blue Nile Signature Canada round diamond review, LD02398394, GIA 2141315883, GCAL 250860105This 1.04 carat, H-color, VVS-1 clarity, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round diamond has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent and is accompanied by a supplementary diamond grading report issued by GCAL. Once again I am unable to agree with GCAL’s assessment that the hearts and arrows pattern exhibited by this diamond is excellent, because there is too much variation in the size and shape of the hearts. Notice how the tip of the heart located in the relative five o’clock position is twisting, that is an indication that there is a difference in the length of the lower girdle facets, and a difference in the spacing that the facets have been indexed upon the surface of the diamond. And it’s not the only instance where this occurs, it is just the heart that features the most noticeable bending in the tip. But if we consider the diamond from the perspective of simply being a GIA Excellent cut diamond with ideal proportions, then we’re looking at a great looking diamond!

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The pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees is going to produce a high volume of light return, and the 35.0 degree crown angle should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facets should produce pin-fire type sparkle that make this diamond look like a virtual disco ball on her finger!

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2141119365

Blue Nile Canadian diamond review LD02359859, GIA 2141119365This 1.05 carat, I-color, VVS-1 clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent. The pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees will provide a high volume of light return, while the crown angle of 35.0 degrees should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle. The unknown factor of course is the degree of optical precision, since a clarity photograph and reflector scope images are not provided on the diamond details page, and I wasn’t able to find any within the multiple listing service (MLS) that we rely upon as trade members to market diamonds globally. However Blue Nile might be able to obtain them upon request. Once again, I recommend clicking the link to place the diamond in your shopping cart to take it off the market before contacting Blue Nile. Be sure to tell them that you’re working with the affiliate site Nice Ice to get to a higher level within the customer service department.

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Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2145370509

This 1.24 carat, F-color, VS-1 clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent. The pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees is going to provide a high volume of light return, and the 35.0 degree crown angle should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, while the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 51831823930

This 1.32 carat, I-color, VVS-1 clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent. It is a bit different than the other GIA Excellent cut diamonds produced from Canadian diamond rough than we’ve considered thus far because it has a pavilion angle of 41.0 degrees, which is one tenth of a degree steeper than my preferred range of 40.6 – 40.9 degrees. The only reason that I’m considering this diamond is because the pavilion depth of the diamond is 43% which is known to produce a high volume of light return. Given the slightly steeper pavilion angle, I put this diamond more in the range of the Top 2% of the annual production for rounds, it’s still going to be a top performing diamond, but the proportions are not quite as tight as the others we’ve reviewed thus far.

The crown angle of 35.0 degrees should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length is likely to produce pin-fire type sparkle.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2127828819

Blue Nile Signature Canada diamond reviews LD02411361, GIA 2127828819, GCAL 242120072This 1.32 carat, H-color, VVS-2 clarity, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round diamond has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent and is accompanied by a supplementary diamond grading report issued by GCAL. Notice that the GCAL diamond grading report issued for this particular Blue Nile Signature Canadian diamond does not feature images of the hearts and arrows pattern. It’s not because Blue Nile or GCAL are trying to hide anything, it’s simply that they didn’t start to feature those images on their diamond grading reports until 2015 and this report was issued in 2014. But I don’t really need the hearts and arrows scope images to tell you that this diamond is on par with the others discussed previously, just look at the tip of the heart in the relative five o’clock position.

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The tip of the heart located in the relative five o’clock position of the pavilion view clarity photograph is bending slightly, as are the tips of most of the other hearts to a lesser degree, and there is a variation in the size and shape of the hearts. So we know that the diamond does not meet my grading standards for hearts and arrows diamonds, but it is definitely going to be a great looking ideal cut diamond!

The pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees is going to produce a high volume of light return, while the crown angle of 35.0 degrees should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 2127827137

Blue Nile Canadian diamond review, LD02411387, GIA 2127827137This 1.52 carat, G-color, VVS-1 clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile is a lesson in due diligence. If you look closely at the diamond grading report featured on the Blue Nile web site for GIA #2127827137 you’ll notice that there is an additional inscription of “BIRKS” indicated just to the right of the Canadian Maple Leaf. I’ve circled the section indicating the “BIRKS” inscription in red to make it easer for you to identify. The diamond grading report featured on the diamond details page for this diamond is dated December 19, 2011. One of the things that I like to do when reviewing diamonds on behalf of clients, is look up the diamond details using GIA Report Check, and when I did that I was presented with an updated version of the report issued on April 16, 2012 that no longer shows the additional inscription of BIRKS Canadian Diamonds. I expect that this type of thing might cause the average consumer to raise an eyebrow or two, however removing an inscription is not that uncommon.

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Blue Nile Canadian diamond review, LD02411387, GIA 2127827137, April 2012 issue dateNor is re-submitting a diamond to the GIA Gem Trade Laboratory to have the diamond grading report updated after the inscription has been removed. The reference to the “BIRKS” inscription on this Canadian diamond no longer appears in the additional inscription field provided on the diamond grading report which was re-issued for this diamond on April 16, 2012. So you might be wondering what’s going on… My guess is that the cutter who produced this Canadian diamond initially sent it out on long term memo (consignment) to BIRKS Canadian Diamonds who likely featured it as part of their Purely Canadian line of diamonds. The diamond didn’t sell for one reason or another, and it was returned to the cutter, who removed the inscription and then sent the diamond back to the GIA to be re-graded. Note that the diamond grading report numbers are the same, the only difference that I see in the information provided on the diamond grading reports are the issue date and reference to the “BIRKS” inscription. Perhaps I should have titled this review: Blue Nile Signature Canada Diamonds versus BIRKS Canadian Diamonds. I had to laugh at their advertising content because it reads “Ice Pure Traceable Canadian” and it certainly is if you take a moment to conduct your due diligence.

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Blue Nile Canada diamonds vs BIRKS Canada Ice Pure Traceable Canadian, LD02411387, GIA 2127827137I can’t make this kind of stuff up! And thankfully I don’t have to, it is lurking just under the surface of the, uh, Canadian Ice, waiting to be discovered! Now this isn’t really a big deal, and I’m not trying to make an issue out of it… But it’s the kind of thing that might cause some confusion without a reasonable explanation. No doubt you might have been wondering what the “BIRKS” inscription referred to without an explanation, and you might have been really confused if you received the latest edition of the diamond grading report if you made your decision to purchase the diamond based upon the earlier version of the diamond grading report, so I felt that the issue needed to be addressed.

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At the end of the day, this is simply going to be a great looking ideal cut diamond of Canadian origin. The 40.8 degree pavilion angle is going to produce a high volume of light return, while the 34.5 degree crown angle should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle. Whether you purchase this diamond from Birks or Blue Nile, you’re sure to love it!

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA 6147433946

The review for this 1.55 carat, H-color, Internally Flawless, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile is going to seem rather bland after that last one! There aren’t any special considerations to take into account, everything about the diamond grading report is straight forward, it’s a classic GIA Excellent cut round diamond with proportions in the middle of the scale allocated for the zero ideal cut proportions rating. There aren’t any clarity photographs or reflector scope images available, so we’ll just have to go by the numbers. The pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees is going to provide a high volume of light return, while the crown angle of 34.5 degrees should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle. The description might seem a bit boring compared to some others, but the diamond should be blinding and breathtaking!

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA1146316930

The same thing can be said for this 1.61 carat, I-color, VVS-1 clarity, Canadian round diamond from Blue Nile. The diamond has an overall cut grade of GIA Excellent and is cut to proportions that are in the middle of the spectrum for the zero ideal cut proportions rating. The 40.8 degree pavilion angle is going to produce a high volume of light return, while the 35.0 degree crown angle should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle. There aren’t any clarity or reflector scope images available, so we have to go by the numbers, which put the diamond well in the Top 1% of the annual production for round brilliant cut diamonds.

Blue Nile Canadian Diamond Review: GIA2141117906

Blue Nile Canada Diamond Reviews, LD02372845, GIA 2141117906, GCAL 222980118It seems only fitting that we wrap up this review of 15 Canadian Diamonds from Blue Nile with this 1.61 carat, I-color, VS-1 clarity, Blue Nile Signature Canadian round diamond, because it offers a really good combination of carat weight, color, and clarity. The diamond is going to face-up completely eye clean and near-colorless (white) and look exactly the same as the higher clarity options presented earlier on in the page. Once again the 40.8 degree pavilion angle is going to provide a high volume of light return, while the 35.0 degree crown angle should produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion, and the 80% lower girdle facet length should produce pin-fire type sparkle that makes the diamond look a lot like a disco ball.

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The diamond grading report issued by GCAL was issued prior to the time when Blue Nile started to feature images of their Signature diamonds as seen through a hearts and arrows scope. However I don’t really need the hearts and arrows scope images to tell you that the diamond doesn’t quite live up to my expectations for what constitutes a true hearts and arrows diamond. There is too much variance in the size and shape of the hearts, some bending at the tips, and the white marks visible in the clefts of the hearts that are visible in the clarity photograph indicate that the clefts of the hearts are split. So don’t expect these diamonds to be “hearts and arrows” regardless of how they are being promoted by Blue Nile, just enjoy them for what they are… very nicely proportioned, GIA Excellent cut diamonds, that were produced from diamond rough that originated from the Great White North that is Canada.

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due:

The affiliate programs for the different divisions of Blue Nile, such as Blue Nile Canada and Blue Nile China, require customers to click on links specific to each program in order for the affiliate to be credited for the assistance which they provide you in helping to find diamonds… So if you want to help contribute to the continued operation of this web site by buying a diamond from Blue Nile, it is critical that I provide you with a link that is specific to the Blue Nile affiliate program designated for your region. Note that using the links provided herein will not affect your purchase price, affiliates are paid out of the annual advertising budget for Blue Nile and other affiliates. The links provided within this article are designed to be used by customers who reside in the United States, and who intend to take delivery of the diamond within the United States. Please ask me to send you a link specific to your region if you intend to have the diamond delivered to a destination outside the United States, thank you. Be sure to take advantage of my free Diamond Concierge Service if you would like me to Search Blue Nile for Diamonds on your behalf, or evaluating a diamond that you are considering.

How I rate Blue Nile Canadian Diamonds overall:

Todd Gray
Todd Gray is a professional diamond buyer with 30+ years of trade experience. He loves to teach people how to buy diamonds that exhibit incredible light performance! In addition to writing for Nice Ice, Todd "ghost writes" blogs and educational content for other diamond sites. When Todd isn't chained to a desk, or consulting for the trade, he enjoys Freediving! (that's like scuba diving, but without air tanks)
Todd Gray

@NiceIceDiamonds

Professional diamond buyer with 30+ years trade experience in the niche of super ideal cut diamonds. In my free time, I enjoy freediving & photography.
The incredible #story behind the Sirisha diamond necklace by @BrianGavin 71 #Diamonds cut to order #Amazinghttps://t.co/dHOo1T99xT - 6 months ago

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