“Blue Velvet” Brian Gavin Blue Fluorescent Diamond Review

I took one look at this 2.296 carat, E-color, VS-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Blue diamond with strong blue fluorescence and immediately found myself singing “She wore blue velvet…” because the combination of the E-color and my experience with strong blue fluorescent diamonds invoked a kind of deep emotion that had to be expressed. I just know that this diamond is going to be a bright blue star on some lucky lady’s finger, and that the appearance of this diamond is going to be as stunning as blue velvet; just look at how amazing the strong blue fluorescence looks when the diamond is exposed to black light! This is a diamond that I would definitely buy for myself if I were in the market for a two carat!

The effect of strong blue fluorescence on E-color diamond:

It seems like every email that I receive from somebody who is considering a diamond from the Brian Gavin Blue collection of ideal cut diamonds which exhibit blue fluorescence, revolves around a concern about what the effect of the blue fluorescence will have upon the look of the diamond.

One of the most common concerns is whether the blue fluorescence will cause the diamond to appear cloudy, milky, or oily, and while this is a valid concern, it is not something which I worry about with the blue fluorescent diamonds offered by Brian Gavin, because I know that he personally evaluates every diamond that is selected for inventory to ensure that the diamonds are worthy of his signature.

Brian Gavin Blue Fluorescent diamond reviews, AGSL 104072195001Generally speaking, the effect of strong blue fluorescence on an E-color diamond, will be to whiten the diamond so that it faces up towards the high side of the color grade, especially when the diamond is exposed to a light source which contains a high volume of ultra-violet light, such as direct sunlight. This 2.296 carat, E-color, VS-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Blue diamond with strong blue fluorescence will glow a beautiful neon blue color when the diamond is exposed to black light (as pictured above) but will look bright and white when viewed under normal lighting conditions, as pictured to the left in this clarity photograph.

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What are the best proportions for a round diamond?

What are the best proportions for a round diamond, Brian Gavin Blue review, AGSL 104072195001This diamond is graded by the American Gem Society Laboratory (AGSL) with an overall cut grade of AGS Ideal-0 and looks exceptional in all of the reflector scope images provided on the diamond details page, so at first glance I was a bit surprised to see that it has a crown angle of 33.7 degrees, because that is shallower than I generally recommend, and it usually means that the diamond cutter failed to partition the diamond properly into sections. However I can tell that this is not the case with this particular diamond because the 14.6% crown height is in balance with the 33.7 degree crown angel, as is the combination of the 40.9 degree pavilion angle and the 43.2% average pavilion angle. Keep in mind that the crown and pavilion sections of a diamond are like tiny mirrors designed to direct light through the stone to maximize light return and sparkle.

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The preferred range of proportions which I recommend in the article 15 Seconds to Diamond Buying Success are intended to  make it fast and easy for you to successfully select a diamond online, but there are many other combinations of measurements that work, the trick is knowing all of the combinations and being able to look at how a diamond is partitioned into sections and knowing whether it will result in a high volume of light return and an even distribution of brilliance and dispersion…

When I look at the total depth of this diamond, and pair it up with the crown height, pavilion depth, crown angle, pavilion angle, and lower girdle facet length, along with being able to evaluate the optical symmetry of the diamond as demonstrated by the various reflector scope images, I’m able to see that this diamond is bright and exhibits a full spectrum of light!

I wouldn’t hesitate to buy “Blue Velvet” for myself if I were in the market for a two carat stone, it looks absolutely amazing in the high resolution video provided on the diamond details page and when I spoke with Brian Gavin about this 2.296 carat, E-color, VS-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Blue diamond with strong blue fluorescence via Skype this afternoon, he assured me that it is every bit as gorgeous as I expect it to be!

Todd Gray
Todd Gray is a professional diamond buyer with 30+ years of trade experience. He loves to teach people how to buy diamonds that exhibit incredible light performance! In addition to writing for Nice Ice, Todd "ghost writes" blogs and educational content for other diamond sites. When Todd isn't chained to a desk, or consulting for the trade, he enjoys Freediving! (that's like scuba diving, but without air tanks)
Todd Gray

@NiceIceDiamonds

Professional diamond buyer with 30+ years trade experience in the niche of super ideal cut diamonds. In my free time, I enjoy freediving & photography.
The incredible #story behind the Sirisha diamond necklace by @BrianGavin 71 #Diamonds cut to order #Amazinghttps://t.co/dHOo1T99xT - 1 year ago

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