Brian Gavin Signature vs Crafted by Infinity, Hearts & Arrows diamond reviews, D-color, Internally Flawless

Hey Todd, could you help me decide between this 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity diamond, and this 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature diamond? The debate that I’m having is whether it’s worth paying the extra $1,239.00 for the larger carat weight, because that is about the same price as the Tiffany knife edge style solitaire that my fiance wants. I just finished reading your review of 3 Crafted by Infinity diamonds and thought you’d appreciate the challenge! — Stephen P.

Brian Gavin Signature vs. Crafted by Infinity, D-color, IF:

Did somebody dub this week “Let’s try to give Todd from Nice Ice a Migraine Week” and forget to tell me about it? What’s up with you people? Are we really going to spend the week picking apart the Top 0.001% of the world’s round brilliant ideal cut diamond production, splitting hairs into microns, in an attempt to figure out whether a Brian Gavin Signature Hearts and Arrows diamond is better or worse than a Crafted by Infinity Hearts and Arrows diamond?

All right, sure, why not… I’m up for the challenge… But you do realize that you could quite literally simply toss a quarter up in the air three times, and just go for the best two out of three, and still come out a winner; right? Because both of these diamonds appear to have what it takes to blow your socks off!

Let’s take this in order of carat weight, because I’m not seeing anything that leads me to believe that one diamond is going to exhibit any better light return or visual performance than the other…

Crafted by Infinity diamond review: AGS 104071881023

Crafted by Infinity D-color, Internally Flawless diamond review, AGSL 104071881023This 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond has been graded by the AGS Laboratory with an overall cut grade of AGS Ideal-0 on their Light Performance grading platform, which uses Angular Spectrum Evaluation Technology (ASET) to measure the brightness of the diamond and determine the degree to which light is being evenly distributed throughout the diamond; in this particular instance, the ASET image indicates that the diamond exhibits an exceptional level of brightness and as you can see by the patterns of red, green, and blue, the light is evenly distributed. The diamond has a total depth of 61.7% with a table diameter of 55.3% and a crown angle of 34.4 degrees which is offset by a pavilion angle of 40.9 degrees with a thin to medium, faceted girdle and a pointed culet, with lower girdle facets that measure 77% in length, everything is spot-on!

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Is “Hearts and Arrows” an important factor to consider:

Crafted by Infinity D color, Internally Flawless, Hearts and Arrows diamond review, HPD AGSL 104071881023As you can see by the photograph featured to the left, this 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond exhibits a crisp and complete hearts pattern when viewed while unmounted through a special reflector scope, which is designed to help us judge the optical symmetry of a diamond. The symmetry grade featured on the DQD issued by the AGSL is based upon “meet point symmetry” and does not take into account the three dimensional optical symmetry of the diamond, which is a critical factor that, along with the proportions of the diamond, contributes to the production of virtual facets, and which will dictate the sparkle factor exhibited by the diamond.

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Brian Gavin Signature diamond review: AGS 104068744001

Brian Gavin Signature hearts and arrows diamond reviews, D color, Internally Flawless, AGSL 104068744001Now as you can see by the photograph featured to the left, the 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond also exhibits a crisp and complete pattern of hearts; I don’t see a distinct difference between the precision of the hearts patterns of these two diamonds, and thus feel that the degree of optical symmetry offered by them is comparable. Important considerations when judging the hearts pattern of a diamond is that the hearts are consistent in size and shape, evenly spaced, with tips which are not bent or twisted, and with clefts which are not split, or which might exhibit extremely small splits, as this is considered to be a very minor factor of the grading process.

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One of the things that I love about both Brian Gavin and Crafted by Infinity, is that neither company appears to edit their hearts and arrows images; because based upon what I’ve seen in the hearts and arrows images provided by several other companies, it appears that those companies are editing their images to make the hearts patterns appear to be more even and consistent than they actually are… And I’ve been collecting images and screenshots of those diamond details pages in preparation of an upcoming tutorial on the subject of how hearts and arrows images might be edited (!) so stay tuned, but suffice to say that these images do not appear to be edited, and one of the reasons why I’m certain of that is because of the fine line which separates the two halves of the hearts in both the image from Brian Gavin and Crafted by Infinity.

How hearts patterns are created in round diamonds via Brian GavinThe reason why there is a line that is visible down the middle of the hearts patterns, is because the hearts are created by the reflection of the pavilion main facet on one side of the diamond, reflecting on to the lower girdle facet located on the opposite side of the stone, thus each heart consists of two halves of a reflection. This diagram provided by Brian Gavin demonstrates how light reflects off of the pavilion main facets to create the hearts pattern exhibited by his Brian Gavin Signature round diamonds. The pavilion facets of the diamond are outlined in orange, with the light reflecting off of the facets being highlighted in green; and as you might imagine, all of the facets must be aligned precisely.

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AGS Ideal-0 Cut versus Super Ideal Cut diamonds:

Brian Gavin Signature, D color, Internally Flawless, diamond review, AGSL 104068744001I consider both the 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond and the 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond to be “Super Ideal Cut Diamonds” because the degree of optical symmetry which they exhibit goes well beyond the grading standards employed by the American Gem Society Laboratory. The Light Performance based Diamond Quality Document issued by the AGSL for this 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond reveals that the diamond is “ideal cut” based upon the fact that it has zero ideal cut proportions, polish, symmetry, and light performance; but it does not address the fact that this diamond has been cut to the level of precision necessary to produce a crisp and complete pattern of hearts and arrows; thus the Super Ideal Cut classification.

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The 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond has a total depth of 61.9% with a table diameter of 56.7% and a crown angle of 35.0 degrees which is offset by a pavilion angle of 40.9 degrees with a thin to medium, faceted girdle and a pointed culet. In a perfect world, I’d like to see the crown angle of the diamond be between 34.3 – 34.9 degrees, but the reality is that a tenth of a degree difference in the crown angle is not going to have any dramatic effect upon the visual performance of the diamond; everything is a sliding scale and the slightly shallower pavilion angle of 40.7 degrees balances things out in terms of the offset for the crown angle.

Likewise I’d like to see the total depth of the diamond be between 59 – 61.8% in a perfect world, but the difference of 0.001% is not going to have a dramatic effect upon the visible outside diameter of the diamond, and the reason that I try to keep the total depth measurements of round brilliant cut diamonds within that 59 – 61.8% range is because of how the total depth of the diamond affects the “spread” or visible outside diameter of the diamond.

Which brings us to the factor which is most likely to help you decide whether to purchase the 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond or the 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond, because with all factors of diamond cut quality and optical symmetry being essentially equal, the only reason I see to purchase one diamond over the other is carat weight and the resulting visible diameter of the diamond.

The 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond measures 6.64 – 6.67 x 4.11 which gives us an average outside diameter of 6.655 millimeters; while the 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond measures 6.88 – 6.90 x 4.27 mm, which gives us an average outside diameter of 6.89 millimeters; and in an effort to provide some perspective, let’s take note of the fact that the average diameter of the eraser on a standard #2 pencil is 6.50 mm.

Which diamond should you choose?

So there are two ways that I usually approach deciding between diamonds of similar characteristics, such as presented to me in this scenario where we are trying to decide between a Brian Gavin Signature vs Crafted by Infinity hearts and arrows diamond:

Solution #1: Forget about carat weight for a moment, and consider the two diamonds from the perspective of their visible outside diameter, and try to decide whether the difference of 0.235 millimeters is worth spending an extra $1,239.00

Solution #2: Consider the relative Price Per Carat of the two diamonds to determine which diamond offers the best price per carat, or relative value based upon the price per carat… So take the wire transfer price of $34,773.00 for the 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond and divide it by the carat weight:

$34,773.00 / 1.100 = $31,611.00 per carat, based upon the cash discount / wire transfer price.

Now do the same for the 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond which is currently priced at $36,012.00 / 1.255 = $28,694.00 per carat.

I can’t say that providing you with this information will help you make a decision between these two super ideal cut diamonds from Brian Gavin or Crafted by Infinity, but perhaps it will provide you with different perspective, and the assurance of knowing that regardless of which diamond you select, that it is going to be drop dead gorgeous! Naturally I’d love to know which diamond you end up buying, and your thought process for doing so, since I can’t say for certain which of the two diamonds I’d choose for myself if I were trying to make the decision at this point.

Brian Gavin / High Performance Diamonds coupon codes:

Oh crud, I almost forgot to mention that I’ve got a coupon code that will save you a bit of money of the price of the knife edge Tiffany style solitaire from Brian Gavin if you decide to purchase the 1.255 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond, just drop me a note and ask for it. And Wink from High Performance Diamonds is offering a similar discount on mountings purchased in conjunction with the purchase of a Crafted by Infinity diamond like the 1.100 carat, D-color, Internally Flawless, Crafted by Infinity round diamond, just tell him that Todd from Nice Ice said hello and ask for the mounting discount. Note that neither of these discounts are applicable with any other discounts or offers, you know the drill.

Todd Gray
Todd Gray is a professional diamond buyer with 30+ years of trade experience. He loves to teach people how to buy diamonds that exhibit incredible light performance! In addition to writing for Nice Ice, Todd "ghost writes" blogs and educational content for other diamond sites. When Todd isn't chained to a desk, or consulting for the trade, he enjoys Freediving! (that's like scuba diving, but without air tanks)
Todd Gray

@NiceIceDiamonds

Professional diamond buyer with 30+ years trade experience in the niche of super ideal cut diamonds. In my free time, I enjoy freediving & photography.
The incredible #story behind the Sirisha diamond necklace by @BrianGavin 71 #Diamonds cut to order #Amazinghttps://t.co/dHOo1T99xT - 2 years ago

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2 comments
BOB GARRASI says November 30, 2017

Brian…how can this price be real?

https://nwct.craigslist.org/jwd/d/250-carat-round-vvs1-f-loose/6386036209.html

Reply
    Todd says November 30, 2017

    LOL. Because it’s not a Crafted by Infinity diamond, but rather seems to be a lab grown diamond by a different Infinity company. The key part of the description is Hybrid Grown ƒrom a 50% Pure Carbon Base” and it doesn’t appear to be cut all that well. I’m definitely not a fan of lab grown diamonds and they seem to hold their value about as well as water being poured through a sieve, more about that in the blog post Lab Grown Diamond versus Hydraulic Press!

    Reply
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