Enchanted Diamonds Reviews, 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent Cut Diamond

Previously I wrote a Review of this 1.81 carat, I-color, VS-1 clarity, GIA Excellent cut diamond from Enchanted Diamonds, wherein I was also asked to review this 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent cut diamond from Enchanted Diamonds, and compare them with this 1.81 carat, H-color, SI-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature Hearts and Arrows round diamond, and help the client decide between what the two options which he referred to as “Enchanted Hearts Diamonds” and the BGD Signature diamond. Let’s start with the inclusions, which consist of small diamond crystals, and a few pinpoint size diamond crystals which are clustered together in what the industry refers to as a cloud.

Notice: this article was written before Enchanted Diamonds declared bankruptcy on June 20, 2019.

Diamond Clarity Characteristics – Clouds:

The diamond clarity characteristics “cloud” tends to be one of those terms that freaks people out, perhaps because they create a mental association with the clouds that we’re used to seeing up in the sky, the clouds that block out the sun; however this is not really the case with the tiny pinpoint size diamond crystals that the industry refers to as a cloud, when they are located in close proximity to each other.

I’ve taken the liberty of adding a few red arrows to the clarity photograph provided above for this 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent cut round from Enchanted Diamonds, to make it easier for you to identify the inclusions, and know exactly what I’m referring to. As you can plainly see, the diamond crystals are extremely small, even when viewed in this clarity photograph which shows the diamond at what I estimate to be about 20x magnification.

While it is relatively easy to find the inclusions within this diamond on your computer screen, when viewed at this higher level of magnification, keep in mind that in the real world, the diamond is about 1.2 millimeters larger than the outside diameter of the eraser on a standard #2 pencil, thus these inclusions are really of no concern whatsoever, you’re not going to be able to see them with the naked eye, unless you’ve got some sort of Eagle Vision Super Power!

Another thing that people often get concerned about is the comment “additional clouds not shown” that frequently appears within the comments section of a diamond grading report. This simply means that the trained diamond grader at the gemological laboratory, was able to detect the presence of additional clouds (clusters of pinpoint size diamond crystals) within the diamond using 10x and higher magnification, but that they were actually too small to plot with any degree of accuracy, and that it is unlikely that the average person would be able to locate them, and rely on them as an identifying characteristic, thus they are noted as being present, but not indicated on the diamond grading report… I’ve always thought of it as a sort of CYA Statement, no big deal in a VS-2 clarity diamond.

What is the purpose of this hearts photograph?

Enchanted Diamonds reviews, GIA Excellent cut 1179986966, this is not hearts and arrowsI’m honestly not sure why Enchanted Diamonds would provide a hearts photograph for a diamond which clearly does not exhibit a crisp and complete pattern of hearts and arrows, but I imagine that it is simply because it is a vendor provided image, and Enchanted Diamonds does not have the time to manually look at the details provided for every diamond in their virtual inventory, but I’m here to tell you that this 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent cut diamond from Enchanted Diamonds, is definitely NOT one that I would represent as a Hearts and Arrows diamond, and you’ll note that they don’t either on the diamond details page, this just shows how the diamond looks through a scope.

The fact that my client mistook the presence of a hearts scope photograph of this 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent cut round from Enchanted Diamonds to mean that it is an “Enchanted Hearts Diamond” is the type of thing that concerns me about diamond vendors providing hearts scope images for diamonds which clearly do not exhibit the higher degree of optical precision exhibited by a true hearts and arrows cut diamond.

Brian Gavin Signature hearts arrows diamonds reviews, AGSL 104078265036, what true hearts patterns look likeThis 1.810 carat, H-color, SI-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature Hearts and Arrows round diamond exhibits what I consider to be an excellent pattern of hearts and arrows, which is worthy of inclusion within the hearts and arrows classification, it exhibits a true hearts pattern, unlike the pattern exhibited by the 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA 3X round cut diamond from Enchanted Diamonds that is pictured above. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see the difference in the consistency of the heart shapes presented in the two photographs, nor how every one of the “hearts” exhibited by the Enchanted Diamond is a different size and shape, and how the tips of the hearts are bent and twisting.

The reason why the hearts exhibited by the 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent round cut diamond from Enchanted Diamonds are different shapes and sizes is because the length of the lower girdle facets is different, and there were variances in the indexing of the facets as they were polished on to the surface of the diamond, this is known as Azimuth Shift.

But the fact of the matter is that I don’t expect most GIA Excellent or AGS Ideal-0 cut diamonds to exhibit crisp and complete patterns of hearts and arrows, because I know that it takes a great deal of planning and skill to produce true hearts and arrows quality diamonds, they don’t happen by accident!

And the only reason that I feel compelled to address this sort of thing in this Enchanted Diamonds Review, is because they have provided a reflector scope image of the diamond, as seen through the hearts scope that is intended for grading hearts and arrows patterns… thus they have essentially required me to scrutinize the diamond as if it actually were a hearts and arrows diamond, while it clearly is not.

The fact of the matter is that I feel that it is irresponsible for online diamond vendors to provide hearts scope images for diamonds which are clearly not hearts and arrows diamonds, because it has the potential to mislead consumers into believing that a diamond is hearts and arrows, when it clearly is not by Japanese or HRD standards, but at least Enchanted Diamonds is not calling it a hearts and arrows diamond, they aren’t the one who called it an Enchanted Hearts Diamond.

Predicting diamond performance by the numbers:

Enchanted Diamonds does not provide an ASET Scope or Ideal Scope image for this 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA Excellent cut round diamond, thus all we have to go on are the numbers, and the knowledge that there is a certain amount of Azimuth Shift. According to the diamond grading report issued by the GIA, this diamond has a pavilion angle of 40.8 degrees, thus it will exhibit a high volume of light return; and it has a crown angle of 35.0 degrees, which should produce a very good balance of brilliance (white sparkle) and dispersion (colored sparkle) while the 80% lower girdle facets provide pin-fire type sparkle, which will be slightly smaller in size than the broad spectrum sparkle that is being produced by the 77% lower girdle facet length on the 1.810 carat, H-color, SI-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature round diamond that I will be reviewing momentarily.

Enchanted Diamonds Reviews, GIA Excellent cut 1179986966, arrows patternThis is the arrows pattern exhibited by the 1.83 carat, H-color, VS-2 clarity, GIA 3X cut round from Enchanted Diamonds, the arrows appear to be fairly consistent and this is promising; although I would much rather have access to an ASET Scope and Ideal Scope image, since those would help me to determine how bright the diamond is going to be, and how effectively it is making use of the light that is available to it from within the room, and the degree to which it is leaking light, all diamonds leak light to some degree, but some leak more light than others! Without that sort of insight, I’ll only be able to give this diamond a three-star rating, although it might rank four stars if I had that kind of info.

And this is where Enchanted Diamonds can up their game if they want to take things to the next level, it’s not enough that you can Search Enchanted Diamonds and find an extensive selection of GIA Excellent cut diamonds with a few clarity photographs and occasionally an ASET Scope or Ideal Scope image, with a hearts and arrows photograph tossed into the mix from time to time… Arguably, it’s actually more confusing when this type of information is provided in an inconsistent manner.

I’d like to see Enchanted Diamonds provide a clarity photograph, ASET Scope, and Ideal Scope image for every diamond in their virtual inventory, and only provide hearts and arrows scope images of the diamonds, when they might actually be considered true hearts and arrows cut diamonds. Now maybe this sort of thing is just a pipe dream, a fantasy concocted by a seasoned diamond buying professional who has too much time on his hands, or maybe it’s something that a couple of young pups with some pretty amazing technological resources can figure out how to deliver, but I’m throwing down the gauntlet in hopes that they’ll rise up to the challenge!

Now we’re going to Review this 1.810 carat, H-color, SI-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature Hearts and Arrows diamond, and discover why I do think that diamonds cut to this level of perfection are are worth the extra expense, and why I focused on the niche of Hearts and Arrows Diamonds when I was actively buying and selling diamonds for the trade.

About the Author Todd Gray

Todd Gray is a professional diamond buyer with 30+ years of trade experience. He loves to teach people how to buy diamonds that exhibit incredible light performance! In addition to writing for Nice Ice, Todd "ghost writes" blogs and educational content for other diamond sites. When Todd isn't chained to a desk, or consulting for the trade, he enjoys Freediving! (that's like scuba diving, but without air tanks)

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