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    He Went to Jared Galleria of Fine Jewelry & Leo Diamond Review

    He Went to Jared

    It seems like every time I'm driving my car, I'm subjected to the jingle for Jared. In other words, I've got to hear "He went to Jared, the Galleria of Fine Jewelry" again and again. As a matter of fact, I want to crash my car into a pole every time it plays.

    Perhaps it's because I actually buy diamonds for a living, but I find the very nature of the advertisements mind numbingly stupid. Seriously, the day the GPS in my car starts to provide me with advice on how to buy a diamond, is the day I rip it out of the dash and toss it out the window.

    Under those circumstances, I'll gladly pay the fine for littering and the cost of a more intelligent navigation system. Apparently I'm not alone in my opinion of the "He went to Jared" advertising campaign. Because when I searched the term on Google, one of the first things that popped up was this meme from Urban Dictionary.

    In the first place they suggest that (he) "went to Jared" because (he) "is cheap and/or has poor or unsophisticated taste in jewelry." Then they proceed to mock the entire "he went to Jared" advertising campaign. As a matter of fact, they suggest that all women are going to have the exact same engagement ring. Obviously, this is because he went to Jared and apparently so did everybody else.

    The Truth About Why I Went to Jared:

    I have to admit that I find the Urban Dictionary meme kind of amusing. With that in mind, you know what I had to do next, right? That's right, I hopped in the car and I went to Jared, the Galleria of Fine Jewelry.

    Obviously, I went to Jared with the full knowledge and intent of subjecting myself to the sales pressure. At the same time, it happens to be located next to Safeway, and I needed groceries... I'm not kidding.

    As luck would have it, this particular Jared's Galleria of Fine Jewelry was under construction. Given the fact that it's not going to be open for a while, I went grocery shopping. When I returned home, I proceeded to shop for diamonds the old-fashioned way. In other words, I searched for diamonds using my preferred selection criteria on Jared's website. To be perfectly honest, this was much more enjoyable than subjecting myself to the usual sales banter.

    Navigating the Jared's Galleria of Fine Jewelry Website:

    There are three brands of diamonds on the Jared website that interest me. All of which I imagine should encompass the level of precision I am looking for. Or perhaps I should say the level of precision I am accustomed to seeing in an ideal cut diamond. Specifically, the diamond brands we'll be looking at today from Jared's are:

    To begin with, we'll search for Leo Diamonds in the range of quality that is suitable for an engagement ring. This means that we'll set the search parameters as follows:

    • Clarity: SI-1 to VVS-1
    • Color: D to J.
    • Carat weight: 0.60 - 5.00 carats.

    Consequently, this range of parameters gives me four Leo Diamonds from Jared to consider. Needless to say, I'm feeling rather unimpressed with the myriad of possibilities.

    Review of the (4) Leo Diamonds from Jared:

    The list of Leo Diamonds available from Jared on this particular day include the following options:

    In the first place, there is a 0.97 carat, I-color, SI-1 clarity, Leo Diamond "certified" by the IGI Laboratory. This diamond has an overall cut grade of good and I usually consider nothing less than Excellent or Ideal. For reference purposes, this is "diam239863" in Jared's inventory system.

    Second, there is a 1.03 carat, H-color, VVS-2 clarity, Leo Diamond, graded by some laboratory I've never heard of. The overall cut grade is very good. Refer to Jared diamond inventory number: diam172029.

    Third, there is a 1.97 carat, I-color, SI-1 clarity, Leo Diamond graded by the IGI with a polish and symmetry rating of good. For some reason, Jared the Galleria of Fine Jewelry has this diamond listed as a very good cut round diamond. This is "diam99129" in their inventory list.

    Last but not least, there is a 3.96 carat, I-color, SI-1 clarity, Leo Diamond graded by the IGI with an overall cut grade of good. The reference number for this diamond is "diam206515".

    Let's Take a Closer Look at the 1.97 carat, Leo Diamond from Jared:

    Leo Diamond

    In view of the fact that the weight of the 1.97 carat makes it unique, I think it warrants a closer look. After all, it should have an attractive price since it falls just short of the 2.00 carat mark. On that note, you should be aware that there is a substantial price increase that occurs between the 1.99 - 2.00 carat mark.

    At the same time, I'm kind of curious about why Jared would advertise this diamond as being very good cut. Seeing that the lab report on the left indicates that the polish and symmetry rating are only good.

    Perhaps it's a typographical error, but standard gemological practice dictates that the overall cut grade defaults to the lowest denominator. In this particular instance, this means that the highest this diamond can rank is good. However, even if the polish and symmetry ratings were higher, I can't imagine how anybody could consider the proportions of this diamond very good.

    In view of the fact that the IGI indicates that the total depth is 64.1% and that happens to be very deep. As a matter of fact, a total depth of 64.1% is very, very deep by my standards. To put this in perspective, I recommend that you search for diamonds with a total depth between 59 - 61.8%.

    In addition, this diamond has a very thick, faceted girdle edge. That factor alone would result in an overall cut grade of AGS-5 Fair on the grading standards from the American Gem Society Laboratory.

    Missing Crown and Pavilion Angle Measurements:

    Leo Diamond Photo

    Another key point of concern is that the diamond grading report from the IGI does not provide the crown or pavilion angle measurements. As a result of this omission, we're not able to determine which sections of the diamond are too deep. The extra carat weight could be hidden in the crown angle, pavilion angle, girdle edge, or a combination thereof.

    The reason why you want to know the crown and pavilion angle measurements is because it enables you to estimate the light performance. Generally speaking, a pavilion angle between 40.6 - 40.9 degrees will produce a high volume of light return. At the same time, a crown angle between 34.3 - 35 degrees will produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion.

    However, any variation from that range of proportions will impact the volume of light return. In addition, it is also likely to skew the balance of brilliance and dispersion. In this particular instance, it's apparent that the table facet region of the diamond is dull and dark. Therefore, I think it's fair to assume that the pavilion angle is steeper than 40.9 degrees. It's also quite likely that the crown angle is steeper than 35 degrees.

    The lack of optical precision is clearly evident in the clarity photograph above. Notice the lack of symmetry in the arrows pattern and in the degree of contrast brilliance.

    From my perspective, the only thing Jared might consider this diamond to be "very good" is the possibility of selling it. Of course, the downside of that scenario is that somebody ends up buying it under the assumption that it is very good.

    Jared Galleria Leo Diamond Prices:

    It's a little known fact that diamond cut quality can affect diamond prices by up to sixty percent. Given the lack of optical precision evident in the clarity photograph for the Leo Diamond above, I was kind of surprised by the price. After all, I'm accustomed to seeing higher prices for the super ideal cut diamonds that I specialize in.

    Leo Diamond Prices

    As a matter of fact, this 1.97 carat, I-color, SI-1 clarity, 'very good' cut round diamond from Jared is selling for $26K. Thankfully, you don't have to take my word for it because it's right there to the left in black and white.

    Right along with their statement that the diamond have very good proportions. I suppose that everybody is entitled their opinion. Of course, it's not really possible to dispute this claim since Jared does not provide the crown or pavilion angle measurements. At the same time, we know that the very thick girdle edge results in an overall cut grade of AGS-5 Fair.

    Brian Gavin Signature versus Leo Diamond Prices:

    Under those circumstances, I decided to shop around and see what sort of diamond I can buy online in this price range. As it so happens, it didn't take very long to find this 2.201 carat, I-color, VS-2 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature diamond.

    Brian Gavin Signature

    In the first place, notice the difference in the degree of contrast brilliance evident in the arrows pattern. This Brian Gavin Signature diamond has significantly better optical precision. Plus, it has an overall cut grade of AGS Ideal-0 from the AGS Laboratory.

    The 40.9 degree pavilion angle will produce a high volume of light return. At the same time, the 34.6 degree crown angle will produce a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion. This diamond does cost a little more than the Leo, but it also offers significantly better light performance. As a matter of fact, I think that comparing these two diamonds is a bit unfair. After all, it's clearly evident that these two diamonds are not comparable in cut quality.

    The Superior Sparkle Factor of Hearts & Arrows Diamonds:

    H&A Diamond

    Another key point is that this 2.201 carat, I-color, VS-2 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature diamond exhibits a crisp and complete pattern of hearts and arrows. The higher degree of optical precision necessary to create this pattern will also produce more virtual facets.

    In the first place, it is important to understand that virtual facets are internal reflections of light. These are not additional facets on the surface of the diamond. This is a good thing because increasing the number of facets on a diamond does not make it perform better. As a matter of fact, increasing the number of facets tends to reduce the size of the sparkle. This means that modified round brilliant cut diamonds are not likely to perform well.

    ASET Scope Images and Price Considerations:

    With this in mind, you'll want to look at the ASET map on the diamond grading report for this diamond. Because it offers the most compelling evidence that verifies that this diamond is a top-performer. The strong presence of red indicates that this diamond is going to be very bright. In addition, the even distribution of colors demonstrates how evenly this diamond is reflecting light.

    Although this diamond does cost more than the Leo, it's also important to realize that it weighs more than two carats. Remember that there is a major price increase that occurs between the 1.99 - 2.00 carat marks. Given these points, it's fair to assume that this diamond would cost less if it weighed less than two carats.

    Under those circumstances, I think it's fairly obvious that Brian Gavin Signature diamonds offer better value and light performance. Notwithstanding the fact that the Leo Diamond is graded by the IGI which I consider to be a second tier laboratory. Whereas the Brian Gavin Signature diamond is graded by the American Gem Society Laboratory which is widely recognized as being the best.

    Traditional Round vs Modified Round Brilliant Cut Diamonds:

    There are some other differences between these two diamonds, notably the facet structure. The Brian Gavin Signature diamond is a modern round brilliant cut. As such, it features 57 facets and the bottom point that is known as the culet. The size of the facets is larger than those on the Leo Diamond and this tends to produce sparkle which is larger in size and bolder in appearance.

    BGD Signature Diamond

    If you look closely at the pavilion sections of this diamond and the Leo, you will see that they are remarkably different. The Leo Diamond has sixteen pavilion main facets instead of the traditional number of eight.

    The advertising literature for the Leo indicates that higher number of facets makes it brighter. Granted that might seem like a good thing, until you know the reason why the Leo seems brighter. Quite simply, it's because of the way our human eyes disperse white light into color. Or to be more precise, the way that our eyes don't disperse smaller flashes of white light into colored sparkle or fire. On the condition that increasing the number of facets on the Leo causes it to produce sparkle which is smaller in size, the reality is that our eyes aren't able to disperse much of that sparkle into colored sparkle or fire. It is for this reason that the Leo seems more brilliant, but it's at the expense of dispersion.

    With this in mind, you should buy a Leo Diamond if you think you prefer smaller flashes of white light and not very much dispersion. After all, that is the type of sparkle factor that modified round brilliant cut diamonds tend to exhibit. Whereas you should buy a super ideal hearts and arrows cut diamond if you prefer broad-spectrum sparkle.

    Live Review of Brian Gavin Signature diamond:

    Brian Gavin Hearts and Arrows

    By the way, I got a chance to see the 2.201 carat, I-color, VS-2 clarity, Brian Gavin Signature diamond in-person today. As a matter of fact, this diamond is drop-dead gorgeous!

    For one thing, just look at how it looks just sitting there in the parcel paper. Seeing that took this photograph with my camera phone, it's not the best quality. At the same time, I think it shows how much brighter this diamond looks compared with the Leo. Especially considering the fact that I was sitting under fluorescent lighting when I took this picture! Fluorescent lighting is the absolute worst for evaluating diamonds because it lacks ultra-violet. With that in mind, most diamonds don't look very good under fluorescent lighting.

    The inclusions within this diamond appear to be translucent, so they were not that easy to find using a 10x loupe. Another key point to remember is that this diamond has an overall cut grade of AGS Ideal-0. Be that as it may, the proportions are also in the middle of the spectrum which is the sweet spot.

    In the first place, this is why this diamond is exhibits such a high volume of light return and a virtual balance of brilliance and dispersion. Although this may be true, the higher degree of optical precision ensures that the sparkle factor is more vivid and intense.

    In the final analysis, I think it's fairly obvious that I'm not a fan of the Leo Diamond. That means that I'm not likely to encourage my clients to go to Jared. Be that as it may, it's evident that Jared has their place in the market with people who don't know Jack about diamonds. There's a joke in that last statement, just wait for it.

    He Went To Jared Lyrics (HARDY, Hixtape)

    I still got a shoebox full of money
    Sittin' at the top of my closet
    From workin' like a dog
    Got a chicken-scratch note pad
    Of what I woulda said once I bought it
    'Til she called it off
    Now she's pickin' out menus and venues and DJs
    And his cake and her cake, where the honeymoon gon' be
    With a new 'do, with boo-coos of old cash
    I swear that's the furthest damn thing from me

    He went to Ole Miss, I went to work
    He pushes paper, I push the dirt
    He's got that clean cut, drivin' him a clean truck
    I'm just sittin' here with a beer and my jeans tucked
    He's tyin' cans on the bumper of a car
    I'm tyin' one on, takin' it hard
    Thinkin' 'bout him there with a white horse and carriage
    Nearly three karats, he went to Jared
    I went to the bar
    Yeah, I went to the bar
    What's your story, Wallen?

    Haha, well
    I got my own ceremony goin' on right here in the neon
    With my best man Jack
    It'll be a meter-on-a-dash smellin'-bad yellow cab takin' me home
    He'll be in a Cadillac
    On his ride to the airline
    Saint Lucia next to the girl I should still be with

    But he went to Ole Miss, I went to work
    He pushes paper, I push the dirt
    He's got that clean cut, drivin' him a clean truck
    I'm just sittin' here with a beer and my jeans tucked
    He's tyin' cans on the bumper of a car
    I'm tyin' one on, takin' it hard
    Thinkin' 'bout him there with a white horse and carriage
    Nearly three karats, he went to Jared
    I went to the bar
    Yeah, I went to the bar
    Yeah, I went to the bar

    Yeah, well maybe I'm drunk and it ain't that bad
    'Cause I ain't into girls, into guys like that
    Hell naw

    'Cause he went to Ole Miss, I went to work
    He pushes paper, I push the dirt
    He's got that clean cut, drivin' him a clean truck
    I'm just sittin' here with a beer and my jeans tucked
    He's tyin' cans on the bumper of a car (bumper of a car)
    I'm tyin' one on, takin' it hard
    Thinkin' 'bout him there with a white horse and carriage
    Nearly three karats, he went to Jared
    I went to the bar
    Yeah, I went to the bar
    Yeah, I went to the bar
    Yeah, yeah, I went to the bar

    There you have it, Jack went to Jared.

    Although this may be true, I still can't wrap my mind around those commercials or that song. With that in mind, I can't imagine that I'll ever walk into another Jared Galleria of Fine Jewelry. After all, they just don't seem like a good fit for my expectations or client base.

    Be that as it may, I'm happy to look over the details for any diamonds that you might be considering. Regardless of whether they are from Jared or one of my preferred vendors online:

    Just submit an inquiry via our free Diamond Concierge Service. Send me a link to the diamond details page or the lab report number. I'll be happy to look over the details and help you evaluate the diamond.

    About the AuthorTodd Gray

    Todd Gray is a professional diamond buyer with 30+ years of trade experience. He loves to teach people how to buy diamonds that exhibit incredible light performance! In addition to writing for Nice Ice, Todd "ghost writes" blogs and educational content for other diamond sites. When Todd isn't chained to a desk, or consulting for the trade, he enjoys Freediving! (that's like scuba diving, but without air tanks)

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