June 8

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Brian Gavin Princess Cut Diamond, 1.063 carat, F-color, VS-1 clarity

By Todd Gray

June 8, 2013

Brian Gavin Diamonds, Princess Cut Diamonds, Square Brilliant Diamonds

I had a chance to feast my eyes on this puppy the other day and it’s drop dead gorgeous! It’s a 1.063 carat, F-color, VS-1 clarity, Brian Gavin Princess Cut Diamond that is graded by the AGS Laboratory with an overall cut grade of AGS Ideal-0.  It’s been estimated that fewer than 1% of all the round brilliant cut diamonds produced in the average year are cut precisely enough to warrant an overall grade of AGS Ideal-0 and I don’t know what the estimate for princess cut diamonds is, but I assure you that it is a much lower number because most square cut brilliants are produced to retain carat weight and not sparkle factor… but this one is!

Why I Hate Princess Cut Diamonds

Back when I was the diamond buyer for Nice Ice, one of my least favorite shapes to source was princess cut diamonds because so few of them are cut precisely.  The vast majority of princess cut diamonds, and all other diamond shapes for that matter, are cut to maximize the retention of diamond rough, and not to maximize the visual properties of the diamonds, such as brilliance, dispersion (fire) and scintillation.  And unlike round brilliant cut diamonds which are symmetrical (round) and have a set facet pattern of 58 facets (including the culet), princess cut diamonds can be square or rectangular, and there is no consistency in the facet structure from manufacturer to manufacturer.  Buying princess cut diamonds has all the makings of a long, drawn out nightmare, the kind that gives a diamond buyer like me night sweats.

In addition, since princess cut diamonds are generally not symmetrical, it is really difficult to buy them based on the proportions of the diamond alone… There are simply too many variables in terms of facet design and crystal structure.  While I love the look of an extremely well-cut princess cut diamond, I simply hated sourcing them for clients because doing so meant shipping in 10 – 15 diamonds just to find one or two which were cut to my specifications.  The solution was to find one or two diamond cutters who routinely produced exceptional looking princess cut diamonds, using a standard facet design and production standards which are consistent… one of those diamond cutters is Brian Gavin Diamonds.

What’s So Great About This Princess Cut Diamond:

So Brian Gavin has been trying to get me to write about  his princess cut diamond production for quite some time now, but I don’t like to write about stuff that I don’t have first hand knowledge of… So I asked  him to bring this diamond to the JCK Trade Show with him so that I could feast my eyes on it and all I can say is “Wow! I’m in Love with it!”

This 1.063 carat, F-color, VS-1 clarity, Princess Cut Diamond from Brian Gavin is everything that I expect a princess cut diamond to be and it delivers an impressive amount of light return and visual performance in the form of brilliance, dispersion and scintillation!  If you look at the image of the diamond as seen through an ASET Scope at the top of this page, you will see that there is consistency in the pattern of colored light moving through the diamond, it’s not all scattered about, this is because the facet structure of the diamond is precisely designed to maximize light return.  The crown angle of 38.1 degrees is an excellent offset for the pavilion angle of 39.3 degrees and they both work in harmony with the total depth of 70.5% and the table diameter of 69.3% to maximize light return.

Now sometimes people get confused about the presence of both red and green colors within the table section of a diamond as seen through an ASET Scope… It is simply an indicator that the diamond is gathering and reflecting light which entered it from the 45° region of the hemisphere which is shared by both the red and green sections of the Angular Spectrum Evaluation Tool (ASET) which was developed by the AGS Laboratory to determine how efficiently, or inefficiently, a diamond is handling light.  This diamond is “handling light” beautifully and is going to make one heck of a center stone for an engagement ring!

From what I can see, all of the Princess Cut Diamonds from Brian Gavin are cut to the same levels of precision and consistency, so feel free to contact me if you’d like help picking one out.

About the author

A mad scientist with a passion for improving diamond cut quality to maximize light performance and sparkle factor. I speak geek in degrees of optical precision between bouts of freediving. My ghostwritten ramblings haunt the rabbit holes of information found on many diamond vendor sites. Diamond buyer, author, consultant, errant seeker of deep blue water.

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