Diamond Stud Earrings $1,500.00 to $3,000.00

The Holiday Season is well under way, Christmas is just around the corner and I’ve got several people who have contacted me looking for matched pairs of diamonds for diamond stud earrings in the desired price range of $1,500 to $3,000 so I did some poking around and found a few options which I really like.

Since I believe the “Sparkle Factor” of a diamond is the most important characteristic of a diamond, my primary focus during the selection process of these diamonds was the diamond cut quality because that is what controls the visual performance of a diamond.  All of the Brilliance (reflected white light or white flashes of light) and Dispersion or Fire (reflected colored light or colored sparkle) and Scintillation (sparkle created as you or the diamond moves) is controlled by the proportions of the diamond combined with the consistency and precision of facet shape, size and alignment which can only be obtained from round brilliant ideal cut diamonds which have been intentionally produced to exhibit a crisp and complete pattern of Hearts & Arrows like those offered by Brian Gavin and Crafted by Infinity.

With that in mind, I have limited my selection of diamonds for the first part of this blog post to the production of those two diamond cutters, however I will be exploring the options available from other vendors from the perspective of price a little further down the page.

Unless specifically indicated otherwise, all of the diamonds referenced have been graded by the American Gem Society Laboratory (AGSL) on the Platinum Light Performance Grading platform which is my preference for diamond grading because it takes the Light Performance of the diamonds into account.

It should however be noted that none of the major gemological laboratories are taking “sparkle factor” into account at the present time and there is a difference between the amount of light being projected by a diamond (measured in Light Performance) and sparkle factor which has more to do with the type of light return in terms of the balance of brilliance and dispersion as created and controlled by the virtual facets of a diamond.  But I’m taking that factor into account throughout my selection process and these first few pairs of diamonds fall into the Barnstormer of Visual Performance so no worries, we’ve got that part of the equation all locked up for you!

First up we have the matched pair of diamonds referenced above from the Brian Gavin Signature Collection of Hearts & Arrows Diamonds consisting of two diamonds which I located using the Matched Pair Locator Tool on the Brian Gavin Diamonds web site.  As stated previously both diamonds are graded by the AGS Laboratory and weighing 0.406 and 0.403 carats respectively.

Both diamonds are SI-1 in clarity and H in color so they are essentially going to be “eye clean” and face up near colorless or “white” so in terms of what people see with just their eyes, these diamonds are going to be amazing!  Both diamonds exhibit crisp and complete patterns of Hearts & Arrows when viewed while unmounted through a special scope and look stunning when viewed through both an Ideal Scope and an ASET Scope.  At the time I wrote this post, the pair was selling for $1,724.00 plus whatever settings you select from Brian Gavin.

Next up we’re going to talk about a pair of diamonds which showed up in the results for the “matched pairs” search engine employed by the Brian Gavin Diamonds web site which I personally would not have put together and I’m doing this to provide some insight into how my selection process works…

The pair of Brian Gavin Diamonds referenced above seem to be a good match at first glance, but this is where having the insight of a seasoned diamond buying professional assist you with the diamond selection process is invaluable if you don’t mind me taking a second to toot my own horn. Although both diamonds are relatively close in carat weight and they are the exact same range of clarity and color, the total depth of the 0.508 carat diamond referenced on the right side of the graphic is at 62% which causes it to have a slightly smaller outside diameter than the 0.514 carat diamond referenced on the right, enough so that I actually would not personally select them as a matched pair.

However in addition to that one of the diamonds exhibits strong blue fluorescence and the other has negligible fluorescence and that kind of thing drives me nuts because the diamonds are going to look ever so slightly different when exposed to intense ultra-violet light and when exposed to black light, the one with strong blue fluorescence is going to glow bright neon blue while the diamond with negligible fluorescence is going to do nothing and that will just look weird.  So these are two diamonds which I think make wonderful options in terms of individual diamonds, but which I would not select as a “matched pair” because they are more like fraternal twins than identical twins if that makes sense.

Now in terms of a disclaimer with regards to my thinking here, I openly admit that I’m a total details freak and that all of the shirts in my bedroom closet are arranged by season, type, color and happen to be facing the same direction on matching hangers, so while the fluorescence difference between these two diamonds will not bother probably 99% of the professional diamond buyers out there, it’s the sort of thing which drives me bonkers.

All right moving on from my little rant on the difference in fluorescence ratings between diamonds selected for diamond stud earrings, we have a matched pair weighing just a little more than one carat total weight (combined weight of each diamond) or 1.019 carats total weight if you prefer to think of it that way (which I do) with a clarity of VS-2 and “I” color with strong and very strong blue fluorescence.

Now while the individual fluorescence ratings for these two diamonds is not exactly the same, the reality is that the visual difference between strong blue and very strong blue is actually very slight and thus there will  not be a discernible visual difference between the two diamonds and thus I’m perfectly happy putting these two diamonds together as a matched pair.

The last pair of matched diamonds which I chose for diamond stud earrings from Brian Gavin weigh 0.530 and 0.528 carats respectively for a combined carat weight of 1.058 carats with both diamonds being SI-1 in clarity and H in color with strong blue fluorescence.  One of the benefits of strong blue fluorescence is that it’s kind of like nature’s white wash for diamonds, so it’s going to help these puppies face up on the high side of the scale for the H color grade rating.

All right that is it in terms of the available options which fell within my selection parameters from the Brian Gavin Diamonds inventory, now we’re going to explore the options available from James Allen Diamonds.  I have to admit that in terms of diamond cut quality and overall visual performance, my personal preference is for the production of the Signature Diamonds from Brian Gavin as opposed to the True Hearts Diamonds from James Allen simply because it appeals more to my personal sense of precision, however there are plenty of people who aren’t willing to spend the money for that level of perfection for diamond earrings.

Let’s face it, diamonds worn as earrings are not going to be subject to the same level of scrutiny as diamonds used for an engagement ring… nobody is going to grab your head and pull it down to look at the quality of the diamonds resting in your ears, but plenty of people wil grab your hand and examine an engagement ring closely… so with that in mind, here are some options from James Allen which are not quite as precise as those previously referenced from Brian Gavin Diamonds, but which are perfectly fine options for diamond stud earrings.

The first matched pair of diamonds which I selected from James Allen for diamond stud earrings consists of a 0.40 and 0.41 carat, I color, VS-2 clarity diamond which measure 4.73 – 4.76 mm and 4.75 – 4.79 mm in outside diameter which is close enough for earrings since they are not going to be placed right next to each other, but would not be acceptable as accent diamonds for a three stone ring in my opinion.

Both diamonds are graded by the GIA Laboratory with an overall cut rating of Excellent which takes the polish, symmetry and proportions of the diamond into account, but which does not take the Light Performance of the diamond into consideration which was measured by the AGS Laboratory for the diamonds referenced previously from Brian Gavin.  The total price for these diamonds at the time this article was published was $1,790.00 plus the cost of whatever settings you select from James Allen.

If we compare these diamonds to the first pair of diamonds which I referenced from Brian Gavin Diamonds at the top of this page, they are relatively the same carat weight, one color grade lower and one clarity grade better and not as nice in terms of diamond cut quality and the price is within fourteen dollars, so guess which pair I’d go with… that’s right, the pair from Brian Gavin because I’m truly all about the sparkle factor and my preference is for diamond cut quality all the way, but if it were not available I would definitely consider this pair as a second option.

Now if you’re looking for something a little higher up on the color scale for diamonds, this pair weighing 0.81 carats total weight from James Allen is G color and SI-2 in clarity so we’ve gone down a bit in clarity and you might be able to see an inclusion or two with just your eyes if you look really hard but you pick up a little bit in terms of the diamonds being a hint whiter.  Both diamonds have an overall cut rating of GIA Excellent and are selling for $1,680.00 plus the cost of settings.

Well that’s pretty much it in terms of options from James Allen for matched pairs of diamonds for diamond stud earrings, their search engine produced eleven pages of results however these are the only two pairs which I consider to be truly viable matches within the scope of my selection criteria.

Todd Gray
Todd Gray is a professional diamond buyer with 30+ years of trade experience. He loves to teach people how to buy diamonds that exhibit incredible light performance! In addition to writing for Nice Ice, Todd "ghost writes" blogs and educational content for other diamond sites. When Todd isn't chained to a desk, or consulting for the trade, he enjoys Freediving! (that's like scuba diving, but without air tanks)
Todd Gray

@NiceIceDiamonds

Professional diamond buyer with 30+ years trade experience in the niche of super ideal cut diamonds. In my free time, I enjoy freediving & photography.
The incredible #story behind the Sirisha diamond necklace by @BrianGavin 71 #Diamonds cut to order #Amazinghttps://t.co/dHOo1T99xT - 1 year ago

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